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Cotton Consultant's Corner:

Weed Resistance

Sponsored by
D&PL
 

Click here to ask Michael Williams a question or submit a comment about this month’s Cotton Consultant’s Corner.

  
Weed Resistance Recap:
     

   

• Herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth is becoming more prevalent in the Cochran, Ga., area.
 
• Whether we have resistant Palmer amaranth or not, we’re going to
Valor and Roundup at burndown and using Prowl, Staple and Reflex
behind the wheel.
 
• Pay attention to timing and don’t skimp on rates.
 
• Instead of waiting until the 4-leaf stage, spray Roundup as soon as
the cotelydon uncurls.
 
• Consider taking advantage of Monsanto’s Roundup Ready Cotton
Performance Plus program this year.
 
• Pay close attention to timing and calibration.

 

  

Michael Williams
Williams Consulting Service
Cochran, Ga. 

• Worked with Danny Bennett, a well known consultant, at the University of Georgia where I received a degree in Agronomy
• Opened my consulting business in 1995
• Consult on cotton, peanuts, soybeans, wheat and vegetables
• Member of GAPAC
• NCC producer delegate and chairman of the GFB Cotton Commodity Advisory Committee
• Sit on the AFBF Cotton Advisory Committee
• Have a wonderful wife Rebecca and two boys Beau, 5, and Eli, 3
• Between farming and consulting there isn’t a lot of free time, but we enjoy hunting and fishing together, and the wife has beat me a few times fishing.


Herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth is becoming more and more prevalent in my area. Two years ago, we had a little pocket on one side of the county, and now you can pick out the resistant spots in almost any field in the county.

It’s not to the point that we will walk away from a field, but we know there are some fields with pockets of weeds that we will have trouble with.

However, even though resistance is spreading, everyone is working together to come up with a game plan to combat it. For example, whether we have resistant Palmer amaranth or not, we’re going to Valor and Roundup at burndown and using Prowl, Staple and Reflex behind the wheel at planting. We’re dusting off the old playbook so to speak.

For growers who aren’t dealing with the resistant Palmer amaranth issue yet, I would recommend paying attention to timing and don’t skimp on rates. Many times there is the misconception that you have to wait until the 4-leaf stage to spray Roundup. I think it’s better to spray Roundup as soon as the cotelydon uncurls because although a lot of weeds are resistant, many are just less susceptible after they get some age and size on them. When weeds are small and the cotton is small, you can start clean and end up clean. Monsanto’s pilot preemerge rebate program is going to help Southeastern growers, too. You have to keep your receipts and adhere to certain criteria, and Monsanto will rebate for partial Valor and Parrlay purchases on an acreage basis. There are many ways that resistance can spread – with birds or even pollen traveling in the air.

Monsanto is conducting a lot of research on this subject. My Dad and I farm together and are paying more attention to timing and calibration. We check everything – planters, spray rigs, etc. I do this for my growers, too. You have to be precise with rates, pay attention to ground speed, use new tips and the proper amount of water. As for impacting cotton acres in my area, the price of commodities is a greater factor than resistance. My growers are above average and quick to adjust to adverse conditions. They are still farming because they easily embrace new chemistry.

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