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In This Issue
Can The Perfect Storm Continue In 2011?
Price, Price & Price
SE Leaders Hoping Momentum Continues
Young Miss. Producer Has His Own Style
Better Climate Being Forecast For Trade Issues
Early Rains Helped Agricenter’s ‘10 Crop
Arkansas To Release New Variety
Gillon Excited About Returning To Industry
Cotton's Agenda: U.S. Cotton Capitalizing
Cotton Board: Knowing When To Quit
What Customers Want: Cotton Quality Can’t Be Ignored At Retail Level
Western Producers Need Specialized Varieties
Companies Help In War On Weeds
PCG’s Cottonseed Insurance Now Offered
Deltapine Launches Two New Varieties
California Farmers Working On Water Quality
Publisher's Note: Cotton’s Mission: Exceed Expectations
Editor's Note: Industry's Enthusiasm Hard To Contain This Year
Industry Comments
Web Poll: Reaction To Ag Apps For Cell Phones
Viewpoint: Want Cotton Quality? Go To Texas
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace: Know Your Ginning Costs: The Key To Survival
Industry News
Cotton Consultants Corner: Cotton Farming Never Stops
My Turn: Cotton People Won’t Quit
ARCHIVES

California Farmers Working On Water Quality

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Faced with a draft proposal to monitor and improve water quality on the California Central Coast that appears unworkable, farmers are developing a proposal of their own that they say is more likely to succeed. An agricultural working group will file those alternative recommendations with the Central Coast Reg-ional Water Quality Board.

The agricultural working group says its plan would be more effective and more practical than the new draft proposal from the regional board staff. The working group says the board staff draft would do little to enhance water quality while imposing “extensive and massive” record keeping on the estimated 3,000 farms in the region.

“I’ve looked at the draft proposal, and it goes further than I expected,” says Santa Barbara County vineyard manager Kevin Merrill. “For example, requirements for growers in impaired areas add layers of unnecessary documentation of practices that don’t do anything to improve water quality.”

Unnecessary Testing

Merrill says the proposed water quality program would require testing for substances that go beyond those contributed by farming, for example heavy metals. Testing for these kinds of substances more appropriately falls to government agencies, he says.

Kari Fisher, a California Farm Bureau Federation associate counsel, says Farm Bureau will continue to work with the board to ensure increased understanding of best management practices for the region’s highly diverse crops.

Calif. Farm Bureau contributed information for this article.

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