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Water Wars
Irrigation Monitoring Systems Show Promise
Need To Water? Ask MIST
Nomination Form: Cotton Consultant of the Year
Web Poll: Readers Discuss 2012 Farm Bill Issues
Big Plans For Lubbock Ag Museum
Cotton's Agenda: Fingertip Control
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Big Plans For Lubbock Ag Museum

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When groundbreaking occurred in May for the American Museum of Agriculture’s new facility in Lubbock, Texas, it was just the first step in an ambitious project.

Although the museum had its beginning in 1969, it didn’t take the first big step toward expansion until 2002 when it opened its doors at the current location at 1501 Canyon Lake Drive in Lubbock.

Eventually, the museum’s board of directors knew that it would be essential to construct a new facility and adhere to its mission – preserving the history of American agriculture.

“To finally see shovels in the ground and cement being poured means that our hard work is finally paying off,” says Lacee Hoelting, the museum’s executive director.

Target Date In October

Barring any unforeseen obstacles, construction of the new museum will be completed in October, and the facility should open in early 2012. It will take three months to move all of the exhibits and artifacts into the facility.

The museum project is a multi-phased expansion. When all stages of expansion are finished, the museum will have a special conference room that seats 400, as well as various interactive exhibits, parlor, gift shop, children’s agriculture literacy wing and a cotton heritage center.

The reaction from Lubbock area cotton industry leaders has been positive. After many years of planning, the new building is about to become a reality.

“Agriculture is important to America and certainly the High Plains,” says Dan Taylor, Texas ginner and chairman of the museum’s board of directors. “We don’t want the museum to only feature Texas and the High Plains. This is a museum for all of American agriculture.”

For more information, contact Lacee Hoelting at (806) 744-3786 or (806) 239-5796 or go to the museum Web site at www.agriculture.history.com to become a member or contribute.

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