Cotton Farming Peanut Grower Rice Farming CornSouth Soybean South  
spacer
topgraphic
HOME ARCHIVE ABOUT US CALENDAR LINKS SUBSCRIBE ADVERTISE CLASSIFIEDS COTTON GINNERS MARKETPLACE
In This Issue
Miracle Crop
Gin Schools Finish Successful Year
Managing Heat-Stressed Cotton
Central Texas Producers Visit Delta
TCGA Prepares For Challenging Season
Web Poll: The Heat Is On, Moisture Is Scarce
Cotton's Agenda
Editor's Note
Cotton Consultants Corner
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace
Industry News
My Turn: How Things Have Changed
ARCHIVES

TCGA Prepares For Challenging Season

  print email

Despite a recordbreaking drought, Texas Cotton Ginners Association (TCGA) members are preparing as much as possible for what lies ahead when ginning season begins.

That was the mood during the association’s summer meeting at the Gaylord Texan resort in Grapevine, Texas, in June. This was the third summer meeting in the organization’s history, and it attracted a crowd of 225 participants – the largest number to attend a summer meeting.

Fifty-six gins out of 232 TCGA member gin operations were represented at the meeting.

“Obviously, our members are concerned about the drought and the ramifications for the entire ginning sector,” says TCGA executive vice president Tony Williams.

“In the past, we’ve had various kinds of drought that affected different regions of Texas. But we’ve never seen anything quite like this.”

What makes this drought different is how dryland acres appear to have been abandoned completely, says Williams. And, because of the severity of the drought, a lot of irrigated acreage was also abandoned.

Impressive List Of Speakers

The meeting featured several reports from industry leaders. John Robinson, Texas A&M University agricultural economist, gave a market outlook. He has Texas cotton production this year pegged between 4.3 million and 4.7 million bales unless a hurricane or tropical storm affects the crop in south Texas.

Phil Wakelyn, former senior scientist with the National Cotton Council, offered a special Washington update on environmental and labor issues affecting the Texas ginning industry. Wakelyn recently was hired as a special consultant for TCGA.

Tom Sell of Lubbock-based Combest Sell and Associates, discussed the 2012 Farm Bill debate and the mission of the Southwest Council of Agribusiness, which promotes agriculture and business interests in the Southwest region of the United States.

Despite the widespread drought in Texas, Williams says there are parts of the state that received spotty rainfall, allowing cotton production to continue.

“The area between Dallas and Waco in central Texas has received enough rainfall to make a cotton crop,” says Williams. “Plus, the south Texas region should produce at least an average crop.”

In other business, TCGA approved two $25,000 contributions to the new American Museum of Agriculture in Lubbock and the Texas Cotton Museum, which includes the historic Burton Farmers Gin.

TCGA members also are taking all necessary measures as they prepare to process a smaller crop this year.

“Our members are focused on what needs to be done to get through this kind of year,” says Williams. “It will be a challenging crop season, for sure.”

Texas Cotton Ginners Association contributed information for this article.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
email
Tell a friend:
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ad2

 

end