Cotton Farming Peanut Grower Rice Farming CornSouth Soybean South  
spacer
topgraphic
HOME ARCHIVE ABOUT US CALENDAR LINKS SUBSCRIBE ADVERTISE CLASSIFIEDS COTTON GINNERS MARKETPLACE
In This Issue
Cotton's Tradition
What Customers Want
Ark. Consultants Cope With Drought
River's Low Level Poses Problem
Technology Promotes Efficiency
U.S.-EU Talks Could Open Doors For Trade
Early Rainfall Affected Agricenter Crop
Cotton Fashion Show - A 24-Hour Marathon
High Yields Possible During Texas Drought
Calif. Farmers Confront Health Care Rule
U.S. Goes To War Against Insects
Farm Bureau Calls For Unity On Ag Issues
Deltapine Adds Three Varieties For 2013
Ginning Marketplace
Publisher's Note
Editor's Note
Cotton's Agenda
Cotton Consultants Corner
Web Poll
Specialists Speaking
My Turn
ARCHIVES

It's Not Easy Finding Farm Workers

  print email

Nearly two-thirds of farmers who responded to a survey by the California Farm Bureau Federation say they experienced challenges finding enough employees to help tend and harvest crops in 2012. Farm Bureau has released the results of the online survey, which included responses from nearly 800 of its members about their experience during the harvest season.

"Throughout the year and across the state, we heard personal accounts from farmers who struggled to find enough people to work on their farms," says California Farm Bureau President Paul Wenger. "We wanted to find out more about the extent of the problem. Employee shortages were widespread among farmers who responded to the survey."

Widespread Response

The voluntary survey brought responses from farm employers across the state who grow a variety of crops, including both labor-intensive crops and those that do not require significant employee inputs. Questions included whether or not farmers had seen a shortage of on-farm employees and, if so, what sorts of actions they had taken as a result.

Survey highlights included: Sixty-one percent of total respondents say they experienced worker shortages of varying degrees. Among responding farmers who grow labor-intensive crops – tree fruits, vegetables, table grapes, raisins and berries – 71 percent reported employee shortages.

To deal with workforce shortages, farmers offered higher wages, delayed pruning and harvesting, used mechanization if possible, or did not harvest some of their crop.

California Farm Bureau published this story. For more information, go to www.cfbf.com.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
email
Tell a friend:
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ad2

 

end