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My Turn

A Simple Thank You

BY CHUCK FARR CRAWFORDSVILLE, ARK. After 24 years of being an independent consultant I can honestly say I have been able to see and learn to do many things through my consulting business. I have to say that the most important things I have learned have come from my father, clients and other consultants, all whom I call my friends. ... Read More »

Looking Back, Looking Ahead

By Ross Rutherford Lubbock, Texas Okay, I’ll say it. I love tradition and nostalgia. Always have and always will. Looking back on things through the prism of nostalgic spectacles (some call them “rose-colored glasses”) brings a certain comfort in today’s ultra-fast-paced world. I grew up on a small, family dairy farm in the south Texas town of Jourdanton, once called ... Read More »

Keeping Cotton In The Mix

By John Lindamood Tiptonville, Tenn. We have all heard it and probably said it ourselves. “In all my years of farming, I have never seen such strange weather!” And though it will be said again in the future, it certainly describes this year to a tee. A similar comment could be made for commodity prices. We have seen wide ranges ... Read More »

Life’s Lessons

By Jay Mahaffey Scott, Miss. As I get older and more sentimental, lessons learned in my experience become a bit clearer. I have spent time in cotton fields since I was a very young boy in northeast Louisiana. Many of these experiences resulted in hard work, frustrations, satisfying learning experiences and, generally, a good time when considered as a whole. ... Read More »

A Winding Road To Home

BY TRENT HAGGARD KENNETT, MO. A quarter century ago, I excitedly left my hometown of 10,000 to attend the University of Missouri. I was plunging into a student population of more than 25,000. Just the students amounted to two and a half times the population of my entire hometown. During the prior two years of high school, I had often ... Read More »

Power Of Positive Thinking

By Jim Granberry Dallas, Texas When I was a child, my summer vacations were spent traveling with my parents from cotton gin to cotton gin in the family’s blue Buick (the model with four scoops on the front fenders). During those sweltering southern days, I spent untold hours waiting in the shade of cotton gin suction sheds, while my father ... Read More »

Value Of Crop Insurance

By Woody Anderson Colorado City, Texas As I prepared to plant my cotton here in the Texas Rolling Plains, I once again was reminded that growing cotton without access to crop insurance is an awfully risky venture these days. Hundreds of dollars per acre are spent to plant a crop in the hope that it will come up, the weeds ... Read More »