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Varieties & Seed Treatments

Multiple Year/Location Data = Priceless

ARKANSAS Many producers have booked seed for 2017. There are several new varieties with new technologies worthy of a look, so do your homework to best place them on your farm. Variety selection is perhaps the most important decision a producer makes. Once the seed is planted, no amount of worry, work or money can make up for a poor ... Read More »

New products Deltapine Announces Class Of 17 Varieties

The industry’s first Bollgard II XtendFlex cotton variety with root-knot nematode (RKN) resistance and a high-performing early to mid-maturity cotton variety were named to the Deltapine Class of 17 during the ninth annual New Products Evaluators (NPE) Summit. DP 1747NR B2XF and DP 1725 B2XF, were proven to perform by Deltapine NPE growers, who grew the varieties in large-acre plots ... Read More »

Production & Planning 2017 Decision-Making Time For California Farmers

By Bob Hutmacher Extension Specialist/Agronomist University of California Despite the continuing impacts of a long-term drought in California, quite a few cotton growers in the San Joaquin Valley saw some good to excellent yields in 2016. The exceptions were certain locations where alternative water supplies were unavailable or decisions were made to redirect available water to other crops on the ... Read More »

Keeping Things Simple

Monitoring soil moisture and scheduling irrigation doesn’t have to be complicated to be effective, as one Texas High Plains grower finds. By Vicky Boyd Managing Editor When it comes to soil moisture monitoring, David Carter of Levelland, Texas, likes to keep it simple. The same consultant who scouts his fields for pests during the season — Darrell Kitten — also ... Read More »

2017 Seed Variety Guide

Delivered As Promised The menu of cotton varieties from which to choose in 2017 includes a host of high-yielding, good quality selections. To help you get started, seed companies from across the Cotton Belt provided information about their headliners on pages 8, 9, 10 and 12 in the annual Seed Variety Guide published by Cotton Farming. Think about your priorities, ... Read More »

Bogue Chitto Gin

New Mississippi Facility Exceeds Wildest Dreams By Carroll Smith Editor Tucked away in Noxubee County, Miss., about 1½ miles down Deerbrook Road, Bogue Chitto Gin Inc. is an impressive testimony to area producers’ faith in cotton. The 25 stockholders settled on the name Bogue Chitto (“big water”) as a nod to the Choctaw Indian culture that is of historical significance ... Read More »

Show and Tell

Cotton producers in West Texas got a sneak peak at up to a dozen potential new varietal releases during Deltapine's annual field day at Blaine Nichols Farm near Seminole. Nichols and his father, Mark, are two of about 200 producers nationwide that participate in Deltapine's NPE, or New Product Evaluators, program. For the past 10 years or so, the Nichols have planted advanced experimental lines in large 3- to 5-acre plots. They farm the plots as they would their commercial acreage, with each plot being harvested, graded and milled separately. Come December or January when the data on the experimental varieties has been disseminated, NPE producers participate in a conference call to vote on the varieties they think should be released. Between the experimental and commercial varieties, the Nichols have about 20 Deltapine large-scale plots on their farm this season. Mark says they continue to participate because of the benefits the NPE trials provide the industry. Blaine says he's anxious to see how the new XtendFlex system will work once the low-volatility formulation of dicamba is registered. The varieties have been engineered to contain genes that impart resistance to both glyphosate and dicamba herbicides sprayed over the top. Although the Nichols have several XtendFlex varieties on their farm, the plants were only sprayed over the top with Roundup. Blaine stays on top of weeds using the Roundup Ready system as well as several different residual herbicides. He also has adopted a zero-tolerance approach to weeds, but he says controlling Palmer amaranth and Russian thistle as well as a host of others is a constant challenge. Read More »